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Fraud: Scams

Fraudsters try to locate and defraud potential victims using various means, such as USPS mail, telephone calls, faxes, and online chat rooms. Once they contact potential victims, fraudsters use compelling language and scenarios to scam them.

If you are involved in a situation that fits any of the following descriptions, it could be a scam and you should contact National Penn Customer Service Center at 1.800.822.3321. 

Advance Fee ("419") / Overpayment / Fake Check Scam

In this funds transfer scheme, the target receives an unsolicited e-mail containing either a money laundering proposal or what looks like a legitimate business proposal. There are many variations of this scam, including "over-invoiced" goods, money left to you in a will or payment for an auction purchase with a check larger than the amount required, asking for change to be returned.

The target is then asked to front an amount of money for customs, duties or bribes in order so that he/she is able to receive his/her portion of the money. This typically will happen several times – excuses and amounts will vary. In some cases, the scammer will forward to the target a seemingly real check and ask the target to deposit the check and wire some of the proceeds back to the scammer, while keeping the balance. The check will turn out to be fake and the target will be responsible for the entire balance.

Note: Federal law requires banks to make deposited funds available within a certain time period, but this does not mean a deposited check has "cleared." If available funds are withdrawn and the check is subsequently returned unpaid, the Customer is responsible for repaying the withdrawn amount. 

If you believe you are the victim of a scam, contact National Penn Customer Service at 1.800.822.3321.

Job Scams

You accept a job in which you are asked to be a mystery shopper, paid to receive a commission to facilitate money transfers through your account or apply for a job that asks you to set up a new bank account.

Job scammers use reputable online job boards to offer work-at-home jobs or accounting positions. These job scams may require employees to receive money into their existing bank account (or open new accounts) and then transfer the money to another account, often overseas. As payment, the job seeker is instructed to keep a small percentage of the transfer.

In some cases, the scammer will forward to the target a seemingly real check and ask the target to deposit the check and wire some of the proceeds back to the scammer, while keeping the balance. The check will turn out to be fake and the target will be responsible for the entire balance.

Note: Federal law requires banks to make deposited funds available within a certain time period, but this does not mean a deposited check has "cleared." If available funds are withdrawn and the check is subsequently returned unpaid, the Customer is responsible for repaying the withdrawn amount. 

If you believe you are the victim of a scam, contact National Penn Customer Service at 1.800.822.3321.

Lottery and Sweepstakes Scams

A typical lottery scam begins with an unexpected e-mail notification that you have won a large sum of money in a lottery, usually one in a country other than the United States – often originating from free e-mail accounts such as Yahoo, Hotmail, MSN, etc. Scammers will also often use the names of legitimate lottery organizations, thereby trying to make themselves look legitimate. You are usually told to keep the notice secret and to contact a claims agent to validate. After contacting the "agent" you are asked to pay supposed processing fees or transfer charges so the winnings can be distributed.

If you follow the instructions, the check will turn out to be counterfeit, but by the time it’s returned, the criminal will already have the money you wired from your account and you never hear from them again. You will have to pay back the full amount of the bogus check. It is against laws in the United States to participate in a lottery in another country, so a letter saying you have won a foreign lottery is a scam. 

If you believe you are the victim of a scam, contact National Penn Customer Service at 1.800.822.3321.

Dating Scams

Someone you met through an online dating site or chat room asks you to send money for a variety of reasons, including a need for urgent surgery or to make travel arrangements to meet in person.

If you believe you are the victim of a scam, contact National Penn Customer Service at 1.800.822.3321.
 

Internet Scams

You receive a check for something you sold over the internet, but the amount of the check is more than the selling price. You are instructed to deposit the check, but send back the difference in cash. The buyer’s payment will turn out to be counterfeit, but by the time it’s returned, he already has the money you wired from your account. You are responsible to pay back the full amount of the bogus check. When selling or buying on the Internet, only send or accept checks for the exact amount. Ask for cashier checks when possible

OR

You receive a check from a business or individual different from the person buying your item or product.

OR

You are instructed to transfer money, or receive a transfer of money, as soon as possible. 

If you believe you are the victim of a scam, contact National Penn Customer Service at 1.800.822.3321.

Telephone Scams

Unless you initiated the contact, do not give out personal information over the telephone. If the call is not initiated by you, always ask for a call-back number. Use legitimate sources to verify National Penn contact information, including: 

  • www.nationalpenn.com or call 1.800.822.3321
  • Official contact information on your bank statements
  • Phone numbers listed on your ATM, debit or credit card

If you believe you are the victim of a scam, contact National Penn Customer Service at 1.800.822.3321.

Mortgage Scams

Mortgage scams can target both prospective and current homeowners. Prospective buyers should be leery of agencies that offer to falsify or alter information to obtain a favorable loan decision. Con artists may also target distressed homeowners with promises of non-legitimate foreclosure rescue, short sale, or loan modification scams. While there are legitimate companies that offer these services, your mortgage lender is in the best position to work with you to understand your situation and look for solutions. 

If you believe you are the victim of a scam, contact National Penn Customer Service at 1.800.822.3321.

Questions or Concerns?

Please call Customer Service at 1.800.822.3321.

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